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Old Anima
16 Best Practices that Help Bring Contentment in Old Age Reaching early old age, which I personally define as 60, is both a happy and sad time. The only thing, really, that makes it stand out is the realization that your body is changing in ways that are not exactly pleasurable. If you’re lucky, your mind stays the same as it was, let’s say, on average, when you were in your early 20s after you have pretty much established what you believe in. You still think along the same lines. You still strive to get better, to produce what your skills are pushing you to produce. You keep your younger heart. Around this time, you see how people are starting to treat you a bit differently than what you’ve grown accustomed to, and it feels disturbing. And when you look in the mirror, the prospect of being somewhat appalled occurs more frequently, like when you see a new brown spot on your arm, for example. So, you become a stoic, because there’s not much you can do about those brown spots accumulating on your arms. In short, the physiological aspects of growing old are very sad. But, if you’re mentally tuned in to the psychological and philosophical aspects of growing old in a healthy manner, there are a good number of best practices that lean heavily toward growing more content and happier in your old age. What are they? Below are 16 factors that bring contentment in old age based on, of course, my own experiences that have worked well for me at 65, so they will not apply to everyone. 1. Be thankful and try to take a “life is good” attitude. 2. Take pleasure in speaking the truth and sharing your wisdom, but don’t overdo it. Stay humble. 3. Don’t let ageism get to you. It’s an unfortunate fact of life, so it seems best to take a stoic approach to ageism. 4. Keep on keeping on. I say this all the time and all it means is don’t give up. Keep putting forth an effort toward being a better human and be open to realizing your faults and fixing them. 5. Be careful about over focusing on typically fleeting hedonistic pursuits. 6. Continue to love your family unconditionally. 7. Look up at the sky more often, learn more about nature, and take pleasure in the outdoors whenever you can. 8. Listen to your favorite music more often. 9. From a materialistic point of view, don’t think about what you don’t have. 10. Realize that everyone has issues you don’t know about, so treat everyone equally, even those you might vehemently oppose for political, or other, reasons. That doesn’t mean you should break bread with folks you really disagree with, but simply don’t overly judge them. 11. Focus on what’s referred to as eudaimonic well-being, meaning, in brief, working on a purpose in life that supports the greater good. 12. Be true to yourself. This is an important time in your life when your authenticity should shine bright. The status quo should be meaningless. 13. Meditate more often, even if it’s for a brief few minutes each day. 14. Practice good diet and exercise routines for better health. Eating right and exercising regularly are much more effective, IMO, than asking your doctor to heal you and taking all kinds of meds. 15. Avoid overindulging in alcohol. 16. Be a life-long learner. Thanks for stopping by, George
“Be content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.” - Lao Tzu
Old Anima
© Copyright 2021. UnderstandingXYZ.com. All rights reserved.
“Be content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.” - Lao Tzu
16 Best Practices that Help Bring Contentment in Old Age Reaching early old age, which I personally define as 60, is both a happy and sad time. The only thing, really, that makes it stand out is the realization that your body is changing in ways that are not exactly pleasurable. If you’re lucky, your mind stays the same as it was, let’s say, on average, when you were in your early 20s after you have pretty much established what you believe in. You still think along the same lines. You still strive to get better, to produce what your skills are pushing you to produce. You keep your younger heart. Around this time, you see how people are starting to treat you a bit differently than what you’ve grown accustomed to, and it feels disturbing. And when you look in the mirror, the prospect of being somewhat appalled occurs more frequently, like when you see a new brown spot on your arm, for example. So, you become a stoic, because there’s not much you can do about those brown spots accumulating on your arms. In short, the physiological aspects of growing old are very sad. But, if you’re mentally tuned in to the psychological and philosophical aspects of growing old in a healthy manner, there are a good number of best practices that lean heavily toward growing more content and happier in your old age. What are they? Below are 16 factors that bring contentment in old age based on, of course, my own experiences that have worked well for me at 65, so they will not apply to everyone. 1. Be thankful and try to take a “life is good” attitude. 2. Take pleasure in speaking the truth and sharing your wisdom, but don’t overdo it. Stay humble. 3. Don’t let ageism get to you. It’s an unfortunate fact of life, so it seems best to take a stoic approach to ageism. 4. Keep on keeping on. I say this all the time and all it means is don’t give up. Keep putting forth an effort toward being a better human and be open to realizing your faults and fixing them. 5. Be careful about over focusing on typically fleeting hedonistic pursuits. 6. Continue to love your family unconditionally. 7. Look up at the sky more often, learn more about nature, and take pleasure in the outdoors whenever you can. 8. Listen to your favorite music more often. 9. From a materialistic point of view, don’t think about what you don’t have. 10. Realize that everyone has issues you don’t know about, so treat everyone equally, even those you might vehemently oppose for political, or other, reasons. That doesn’t mean you should break bread with folks you really disagree with, but simply don’t overly judge them. 11. Focus on what’s referred to as eudaimonic well- being, meaning, in brief, working on a purpose in life that supports the greater good. 12. Be true to yourself. This is an important time in your life when your authenticity should shine bright. The status quo should be meaningless. 13. Meditate more often, even if it’s for a brief few minutes each day. 14. Practice good diet and exercise routines for better health. Eating right and exercising regularly are much more effective, IMO, than asking your doctor to heal you and taking all kinds of meds. 15. Avoid overindulging in alcohol. 16. Be a life-long learner. Thanks for stopping by, George