Old Anima
© Copyright 2021 UnderstandingXYZ.com, All rights reserved.
Articles About Older Adult Work
Aging, Retirement & Place I do not consider myself financially well off in the least, but I have worked hard all my life, mostly as a freelance writer and publisher – a tough business that I would not recommend to anyone unless you have a very thick skin that can take more rejection than what most people deal with throughout their lives. READ MORE Scholars on Aging: How Art Promotes Well-being This is the first post of a new series I’m calling “Scholars on Aging” in which I synthesize some of what I personally consider, from self-studies, to be the most interesting articles and books written by academics and authors around the world who conduct research on aging. READ MORE Economics of Soul vs. a Job in Old Age While I have always been a highly introspective person, I never thought my introspection would grow more prominently into old age. I assumed (never assume) that by now – at 64 – I would have it all figured out and there would be less of a need to be looking inward and more of a desire to pursue leisurely activities. READ MORE Eight Books on How to Deal with Procrastination As a work-for-hire freelance writer, I have always believed that the deliberate practice of my work over the years/decades would give me some small semblance of financial success and a more continuous stream of reliable, paid work by this stage of life in my early sixties. I believed I would have more clients to write for to a point in which I’d be forced to refuse potential customers, and that my fees would go up due to my professional experience and honed talent. Instead, I’m experiencing less work due to ageism. Plus, even in those instances when I had garnered an occasional writing assignment, the pay had dropped dramatically to less than 50 percent of what I used to get. READ MORE
On Neo-Luddites and Optimists in the 21st Century Internet Age Today’s Digital Revolution is a Story of Yin and Yang Opposites Consider many of the technological innovations that have developed over a relatively short period of time and dramatically changed the way humans live and work today. It has only been 28 years since Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. The early 1990s heralded in the first smartphones, and it wasn’t until 2007 that iPhones hit the mobile marketplace. The iPad was launched in 2010. Facebook launched in 2004. Google was founded in 1998, and Twitter came along in 2006. GPS did not even begin to gain wide acceptance with the public until the mid-1990s. IBM’s Watson demonstrated its powerful artificial intelligence on Jeopardy a little over seven years ago in February 2011. READ MORE
otium compass art and aging soul procrastination
Ruminating on Otium Otium” is a new word I picked up from an online discussion. It’s a wonderful word that has very interesting implications for people in their retirement years. READ MORE
My New Respect for Retail Employees and a Serendipitous Message from an Artist I’ve always enjoyed strolling around office supply and electronic product stores. So, when I was suddenly forced to figure out how to quickly supplement my social security income after my self-employment anchor-client relationship unexpectedly ended due to economic reasons, I was both surprised and grateful to be hired as a part-time printing/marketing customer-service associate for a well-known national office supply store located a short 5 minutes from where I live. I figured I could handle about 15 to 20 hours per week servicing customers with their copy and printing needs, especially since I have a strong background in publication design and production, even though the job paid only $10.30 per hour. READ MORE
compass
Scholars on Aging Series: How the way people react to and treat us teaches us Many odd, disconcerting thoughts surface during your sixties. It’s a time, I believe, when we start “learning to be old,” which happens to be the top-level title of an excellent academic paper I read recently, “Learning to be Old: How Qualitative Research Contributes to Our Understanding of Ageism,” by Deborah K. van den Hoonaard, from the Gerontology Department at St. Thomas University in New Brunswick, Canada. READ MORE
otium
“What new technology does is create new opportunities to do a job that customers want done.” - Tim O’Reilly
The Ups and Downs of Older Adult Workers The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates that by 2024, the U.S. population will include 41 million people age 55 and older, with 13 million people comprising the 65 and older age group. The 65 and older “are projected to have faster rates of labor force growth annually than any other age groups.” READ MORE
compass
Mixed Bag of Demographics and Labor Market Shifts Paint Confusing Picture of What’s In Store for Working Older Adults
Prognosticating anything is always a risky endeavor, but here we attempt to paint a picture of what the world of work may or may not look like for older adults (age 45 and older) in the not-too-distant future. READ MORE
compass
Old Anima
© Copyright 2021. UnderstandingXYZ.com. All rights reserved.
Articles About Older Adult Work:
My New Respect for Retail Employees and a Serendipitous Message from an Artist I’ve always enjoyed strolling around office supply and electronic product stores. So, when I was suddenly forced to figure out how to quickly supplement my social security income after my self-employment anchor-client relationship unexpectedly ended due to economic reasons, I was both surprised and grateful to be hired as a part-time printing/marketing customer-service associate for a well-known national office supply store located a short 5 minutes from where I live. I figured I could handle about 15 to 20 hours per week servicing customers with their copy and printing needs, especially since I have a strong background in publication design and production, even though the job paid only $10.30 per hour. READ MORE Aging, Retirement & Place I do not consider myself financially well off in the least, but I have worked hard all my life, mostly as a freelance writer and publisher – a tough business that I would not recommend to anyone unless you have a very thick skin that can take more rejection than what most people deal with throughout their lives. READ MORE Scholars on Aging: How Art Promotes Well-being This is the first post of a new series I’m calling “Scholars on Aging” in which I synthesize some of what I personally consider, from self- studies, to be the most interesting articles and books written by academics and authors around the world who conduct research on aging. READ MORE Economics of Soul vs. a Job in Old Age While I have always been a highly introspective person, I never thought my introspection would grow more prominently into old age. I assumed (never assume) that by now – at 64 – I would have it all figured out and there would be less of a need to be looking inward and more of a desire to pursue leisurely activities. READ MORE Eight Books on How to Deal with Procrastination As a work-for-hire freelance writer, I have always believed that the deliberate practice of my work over the years/decades would give me some small semblance of financial success and a more continuous stream of reliable, paid work by this stage of life in my early sixties. I believed I would have more clients to write for to a point in which I’d be forced to refuse potential customers, and that my fees would go up due to my professional experience and honed talent. Instead, I’m experiencing less work due to ageism. Plus, even in those instances when I had garnered an occasional writing assignment, the pay had dropped dramatically to less than 50 percent of what I used to get. READ MORE On Neo-Luddites and Optimists in the 21st Century Internet Age Today’s Digital Revolution is a Story of Yin and Yang Opposites Consider many of the technological innovations that have developed over a relatively short period of time and dramatically changed the way humans live and work today. It has only been 28 years since Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. The early 1990s heralded in the first smartphones, and it wasn’t until 2007 that iPhones hit the mobile marketplace. The iPad was launched in 2010. Facebook launched in 2004. Google was founded in 1998, and Twitter came along in 2006. GPS did not even begin to gain wide acceptance with the public until the mid-1990s. IBM’s Watson demonstrated its powerful artificial intelligence on Jeopardy a little over seven years ago in February 2011. READ MORE Ruminating on Otium Otium” is a new word I picked up from an online discussion. It’s a wonderful word that has very interesting implications for people in their retirement years. READ MORE Scholars on Aging Series: How the way people react to and treat us teaches us when we’re old. Many odd, disconcerting thoughts surface during your sixties. It’s a time, I believe, when we start “learning to be old,” which happens to be the top-level title of an excellent academic paper I read recently, “Learning to be Old: How Qualitative Research Contributes to Our Understanding of Ageism,” by Deborah K. van den Hoonaard, from the Gerontology Department at St. Thomas University in New Brunswick, Canada. READ MORE
compass compass art and aging soul procrastination otium otium
“What new technology does is create new opportunities to do a job that customers want done.” Tim O’Reilly
The Ups and Downs of Older Adult Workers The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates that by 2024, the U.S. population will include 41 million people age 55 and older, with 13 million people comprising the 65 and older age group. The 65 and older “are projected to have faster rates of labor force growth annually than any other age groups.” READ MORE
compass
Mixed Bag of Demographics and Labor Market Shifts Paint Confusing Picture of What’s In Store for Working Older Adults
Prognosticating anything is always a risky endeavor, but here we attempt to paint a picture of what the world of work may or may not look like for older adults (age 45 and older) in the not-too-distant future. READ MORE
compass